Buffett Institute - Early Childhood Workforce Commission
Start Early. Start well.

Nebraska Early Childhood Workforce Commission

Elevating Nebraska's Early Childhood Workforce: Report and Recommendations of the Nebraska Early Childhood Workforce Commission is a groundbreaking report that outlines the urgent need to prioritize the early childhood workforce in Nebraska for our children, families, communities, and state. Read the report

two-year implementation update

A summary of some of the collaborative statewide efforts in the past year made in support of the vision, goals, and recommendations outlined in the Nebraska Early Childhood Workforce Commission's 2020 report. 

Two-year update (download PDF) 

commission VISION, GOALS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Vision: Nebraska will elevate the early childhood workforce to a priority profession benefiting all children from birth through Grade 3.

Workforce Commission report goal 1

goal 1

Ensure the early childhood workforce is highly qualified and reflects the diversity of the children and families they serve. (1) Define and support high-quality practice across all early childhood settings. (2) Develop accessible and affordable professional pathways.

Workforce Commission report goal 2

goal 2

Fully fund high-quality care and education by 2030. (1) Build on Nebraska's current early care and education investment. (2) Develop locally informed cost estimates of high-quality early care and education. (3) Close the funding gap.

Workforce Commission report goal 3

goal 3

Nebraskans champion the critical role of the early childhood workforce in young children's learning and development. Lasting change requires collective action: (1) Inform Nebraskans. (2) Engage Nebraskans. (3) Seek Nebraskans' commitment.

Workforce report: Goal 4

goal 4

Implement the commission's recommendations. (1) Develop and implement the infrastructure needed. (2) Engage stakeholders across Nebraska.

The commission was co-chaired by Marjorie J. Kostelnik, professor of Child, Youth, and Family Studies and formerly dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and Samuel J. Meisels, founding executive director of the Buffett Early Childhood Institute.
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